Hammertoes & Crooked Toes

A hammertoe is commonly mistaken as any type of toe deformity. The terms claw toe, or mallet toe, although technically different than a hammer toe, are commonly referred as such. The toe may be flexible with movement at the joints, or it may be rigid, especially if it has been present for a long time. With a true hammertoe, the deformity exists at the proximal interphalangeal joint only. The true mallet toe has its deformity at the distal interphalangeal joint only and more commonly causes a callous on the tip of the toe as pressure is placed there. The true claw toe is a combination of the hammer and mallet toe deformities and involves both joints of the toe. If the big toe (hallux) has a hammertoe, it is more commonly called a Hallux Hammertoe and may be treated somewhat differently than described here.

Symptoms of a hammertoe are usually first noticed as a corn on the top of the toe or at the tip which produces pain with walking or wearing tight shoes. Most people feel a corn is due to a skin problem on their toes, which in fact, it is protecting the underlying bone deformity. A corn on the toe is sometimes referred to as a heloma dura or heloma durum, meaning hard corn. This is most common at the level of the affected joint due to continuous friction of the deformity against your shoes. A soft corn, or heloma molle, may also exist in the web space between toes. This is more commonly caused by an exostosis, which is basically an extra growth of bone possibly due to your foot structure. As this outgrowth of excessive bone rubs against other toes, there is friction between the toes and a corn forms for your protection. 

Causes of hammertoes are usually structural in nature. Many times this is the foot structure you were born with and other factors have now made it so that symptoms appear. The muscles in your foot may become unbalanced over time, allowing for a deformity of the small bones in each toe. With longstanding deformity, the toe may become rigid. Sometimes one toe is longer than another and this causes a buckling of the digit. A hammertoe may also be caused by other foot deformities such as a bunion. Trauma or other surgery of your foot may predispose you to having the condition if your foot structure is altered.

Prevention of a hammertoe can be difficult as symptoms do not arise until the problem exists. Wearing shoes that have extra room in the toes may eliminate the problem or slow down the deformity from getting worse. Sometimes surgery is recommended for the condition. If the area is irritated with redness, swelling, and pain some ice and anti-inflammatory medications may be helpful. The best prevention may be to get advice from your podiatrist.

Podiatric care may include using anti-inflammatory oral medications or an injection of medication and a local anesthetic to reduce this swelling. When you go to your doctor, x-rays are usually required to evaluate the structure of your foot, check for fractures and determine the cause. The podiatrist may see you to take care of any corns that develop due to the bone deformities. They may advise you on different shoewear or prescribe a custom made orthotic to try and control the foot structure. Padding techniques may be used to straighten the toe if the deformity is flexible, or pads may be used to lessen the pressure on the area of the corn or ulcer. Your podiatric physician may also recommend a surgical procedure to actually fix the structural problem of your foot.

Surgery to correct for a hammertoe may be performed as an outpatient procedure at a hospital, surgery center, or in the office of your podiatrist. There are multiple procedures that can be used depending on your individual foot structure and whether the deformity is flexible or rigid. There may be a surgical cut in the bone to get rid of an exostosis, or a joint may be completely removed to allow the toe to lay straight. Sometimes when the joints are removed the two bones become one as they are fused in a straightened position. Many times one toe will be longer than another and a piece of bone is removed to bring the toes in a more normal length in relation to each other. Sometimes tendons will be lengthened, or soft tissue around the joints will be cut or rebalanced to fix the deformity. Angular corrections may also be needed. The surgeon may place fixation in your foot as it heals which may include a pin or wires.

MIS Surgery for fixing of hammertoes: Dr. Bregman is the only surgeon who is performing this specialized surgery that does not use big incisions and has a much quicker recovery with almost no pain after surgery! (see before and after pics) He uses a special drill to do all of the surgery through a small incision near the toe and can do all the work needed underneath the skin.

Hammertoe Treatment with Minimally Invasive Surgery

xray-before

Before Surgery

xray-after

After Surgery

hammertoe-before

Before Surgery

hammertoe-after

After Surgery

Interested in a consultation with one of our physicians?

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7135 W. Sahara Ave., Suite 201
Las Vegas, NV 89117
Phone: (702) 878-2455
Fax: (702) 878-4875

Saint Rose Office

3175 St. Rose Pkwy., Suite 320
Henderson, NV 89052
Phone: (702) 878-2455
Fax: (702) 878-4875

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